Tag: Indian fiction

  • Translations: Ila Arab Mehta, Ismat Chughtai, Arupa Patangia Kalita

    Translations: Ila Arab Mehta, Ismat Chughtai, Arupa Patangia Kalita

    (Translations is now a regular monthly column in the Business Standard, covering works by Indian writers.) Fence, Ila Arab Mehta, Translated from Gujarati by Rita Kothari Zubaan Books Rs 350, 200 pages In March 2003, a brief news item, a few paragraphs long, came out in The Telegraph. “Muslims in Gujarat face blatant discrimination”, the […]

  • Speaking Volumes: The messy bits

    Speaking Volumes: The messy bits

    (Published in the Business Standard, May 5, 2014) At the Chor Bazaar in Old Delhi, you used to be able to find Hindi film posters, record album art and what I classified as Readymade Families: discarded photographs gathered in shoeboxes and cardboard boxes. In a faded pink cardboard box the colour and size of a […]

  • Speaking Volumes: The Emergency’s Children

    Speaking Volumes: The Emergency’s Children

      Memory is malleable, and tyrannical: because what you remember is so vivid, you forget how easily memory can be reshaped. Most of the Uruguayian writer Eduardo Galeano’s work has been a reminder of alternate, forgotten histories.   His new book, Children of the Days, is a calendar of human history, with brief entries for […]

  • How To Read in Indian: out in 2014

    How To Read in Indian: out in 2014

    How To Read In Indian is about books, and their magic, and why we still love reading so much in the 21st century.Coming soon–to be published by HarperCollins India in 2014! From the title essay, How To Read in Indian: “The Census 2001 figures, recently released, revealed that English had effectively become India’s second language, […]

  • Booklove: All About Hatterji (50 Writers, 50 Books)

    Booklove: All About Hatterji (50 Writers, 50 Books)

    (From 50 Writers, 50 Books, edited by Pradeep Sebastian and Chandra Siddan, HarperCollins. I wrote this for Pradeep back in 2010, when he called very excited about the idea of an anthology where writers from across (and outside) the country would talk about their favourite books, characters, landscapes. He and Chandra Siddan looked for books […]