Month: May 2003

  • Two ways to spend lunch this Sunday–with Yann Martel or Pico Iyer.

  • More on Harvard and the Unabomber: the Babu read the Unabomber’s manifesto years ago, and while it was confused, rambling and derivative, it made sense in a way the media chose to ignore. The Identity Theory interview with Alston Chase explains why…. Abraham Eraly’s Introduction to The Mughal Throne impresses Edward Luce, especially when Eraly […]

  • No one asks them to contribute to the New Yorker. They wouldn’t win the Whitbread (and wouldn’t want one). The “queens of popular fiction”, Jilly Cooper and Joanna Trollope, join forces in the old argument over the merits of popular versus literary writing at Hay. (The Babu’s summary: Who cares what the critics say/ We […]

  • “Milligan may be dead, but he won’t lie down.” And a dealer’s just made a packet off Spike’s notebooks.

  • In which Arundhati Roy explains that she does what she does because she has to.

  • Middle-Earth is alive with the sound of music…hobbit choruses, anyone?

  • Penguin India’s latest catalogue features the blood brother (sister?) of Anonymous, Pseudonymous. In new fiction, there’s Olivia and Jai, somewhat unpromisingly blurbed as “a novel of love, loss, passion and betrayal set in 19th century India”. It’s written by Rebecca Ryman, the “pseudonym of an Indian writer living in Calcutta”. Hmm. Shrinking violet or publicity […]

  • Anonymous, in this day and age? This time it’s not a Primary Colours deal–Anonymous is an American spy who says he “tried to present a portrait of Osama bin Laden that will prompt better understanding of the man–and understanding does not connote sympathy–and a debate about how best to identify, confront, and defeat the threat […]

  • Looking for the lowdown on William Dalrymple? The Complete Review has a comprehensive set of links.

  • One man has boldly gone where Hemingway has gone before: to Pamplona, to record the running of the bulls. (Heh, the last time we saw the running of the bulls in India was when Ketan Parekh and co. took the stock market on a wild ride around February 2000!)